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/*   Show the example how to use arrays of variables or fields     Runs as: anettest -d eth0 -f this_file.fws  */
INCLUDE
PARAMETERS: <name of file>
Starts processing the content of given file. The search of file will be performed in the current directory, all search paths (see option -I). For every path the content of samples, headers, traces folders will be also examined. You can also type just the name of file without INCLUDE
PARAMETERS: <name of file>
Starts processing the content of given file. The search of file will be performed in the current directory, all search paths (see option -I). For every path the content of samples, headers, traces folders will be also examined. You can also type just the name of file without INCLUDE
PARAMETERS: <name of file>
Starts processing the content of given file. The search of file will be performed in the current directory, all search paths (see option -I). For every path the content of samples, headers, traces folders will be also examined. You can also type just the name of file without include before it.
before it.
before it.
tcp int i = 1
// is used as an index in array
int temp = 0
// creates the array of variables (name of each variable includes an reference in it to numeric variable i)
i = 0 CYC
PARAMETERS: <number of iterations>
Command instructs that next WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in DEFAULTS
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any | REVERS
PARAMETERS: not command
Request specification. May only be given in parameters for DEFAULT command. Instructs to reverse the request for every packet.
}
Defines default requests for packets. These requests will be applied when there are not enough explicitly defined requests for some packet (specified as parameters to command SEND, WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
and its analogs). Initially default requests are ACCEPT ANY ANY... i.e. a single request for the first interface specified via option -d.
(command DEFAULT). For TCP DEVICE
PARAMETERS: <type of device> {<name of interface>}
Reopens interfaces. The type of device: eth, ip, tcp. The name of device is the same as for -d option, depends on the type of device. New line terminates the list of names.
the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Analog of WAIT command. Adds the above packet to the set of packets which will be waited by command WAIT or its analogs. This command does not start actual waiting (doesn't suspend script execution). Nevertheless, just after adding the packet may be registered as received. If some packet is registered as received before the call to WAIT (WAITALL
PARAMETERS: no parameters
The analog of WAIT command. Doesn't add the previously defined packet to the list of waited ones. Starts waiting simply. Packets may be already added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command (or using of UNFIX command).
) then the command will ignore it and wait for a next packet (see also SENDWAITOTHER
PARAMETERS: no parameters
Works similar to "SEND WAITALL" sentence. Purpose: make atomic operation. Without this command there would be a chance that a waited packet did not cause command WAITALL stop waiting if it was accepted after SEND but before WAITALL started waiting. However it would be registered as received in any case. This command should be always used when you need to send a request and RELIABLY receive a response on it never missing.
).
command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) or next block of script will be processed by several times = <number of iterations>. The "inf" value is available which means infinite iterant processing.
10 { int
'array$i$'
= 0
// creates variable ( i - is index)
'array$i$'
= i
// set value for this variable
i += 1
// increments i, GOTO
PARAMETERS: <value of any type> [<stop position>]
Performs the search of the given value in current packet. The search will be started from the current position of byte pointer. Value may has any type. The result of search is available through GOTORES
PARAMETERS: no command
This is a special value which allows to get the result of last search performed by GOTO
PARAMETERS: <value of any type> [<stop position>]
Performs the search of the given value in current packet. The search will be started from the current position of byte pointer. Value may has any type. The result of search is available through GOTORES
PARAMETERS: no command
This is a special value which allows to get the result of last search performed by GOTO
PARAMETERS: <value of any type> [<stop position>]
Performs the search of the given value in current packet. The search will be started from the current position of byte pointer. Value may has any type. The result of search is available through GOTORES
PARAMETERS: no command
This is a special value which allows to get the result of last search performed by GOTO or GOTOB command. 1 - successful search, 0 - not successful search.
keyword. In the case of successful search the byte pointer will be moved to the found entry. Stop position may be equal to -1. It means search to the end of packet. Stop position may be omitted but in this case parameters must be enclosed in brackets.
or GOTOB
PARAMETERS: <value of any type> [<stop position>]
Is similar to GOTO command but performs back search.
command. 1 - successful search, 0 - not successful search.
keyword. In the case of successful search the byte pointer will be moved to the found entry. Stop position may be equal to -1. It means search to the end of packet. Stop position may be omitted but in this case parameters must be enclosed in brackets.
or GOTOB
PARAMETERS: <value of any type> [<stop position>]
Is similar to GOTO
PARAMETERS: <value of any type> [<stop position>]
Performs the search of the given value in current packet. The search will be started from the current position of byte pointer. Value may has any type. The result of search is available through GOTORES
PARAMETERS: no command
This is a special value which allows to get the result of last search performed by GOTO or GOTOB command. 1 - successful search, 0 - not successful search.
keyword. In the case of successful search the byte pointer will be moved to the found entry. Stop position may be equal to -1. It means search to the end of packet. Stop position may be omitted but in this case parameters must be enclosed in brackets.
command but performs BACK
PARAMETERS: <number of bytes>
Reduces the pointer for the given <number of bytes>.
search.
command. 1 - successful search, 0 - not successful search.
keyword. In the case of successful search the byte pointer will be moved to the found entry. Stop position may be equal to -1. It means search to the end of packet. Stop position may be omitted but in this case parameters must be enclosed in brackets.
next element
}
// prints array
i = 0 CYC
PARAMETERS: <number of iterations>
Command instructs that next WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in DEFAULTS
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any | REVERS
PARAMETERS: not command
Request specification. May only be given in parameters for DEFAULT command. Instructs to reverse the request for every packet.
}
Defines default requests for packets. These requests will be applied when there are not enough explicitly defined requests for some packet (specified as parameters to command SEND, WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
and its analogs). Initially default requests are ACCEPT ANY ANY... i.e. a single request for the first interface specified via option -d.
(command DEFAULT). For TCP DEVICE
PARAMETERS: <type of device> {<name of interface>}
Reopens interfaces. The type of device: eth, ip, tcp. The name of device is the same as for -d option, depends on the type of device. New line terminates the list of names.
the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Analog of WAIT command. Adds the above packet to the set of packets which will be waited by command WAIT or its analogs. This command does not start actual waiting (doesn't suspend script execution). Nevertheless, just after adding the packet may be registered as received. If some packet is registered as received before the call to WAIT (WAITALL
PARAMETERS: no parameters
The analog of WAIT command. Doesn't add the previously defined packet to the list of waited ones. Starts waiting simply. Packets may be already added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command (or using of UNFIX command).
) then the command will ignore it and wait for a next packet (see also SENDWAITOTHER
PARAMETERS: no parameters
Works similar to "SEND WAITALL" sentence. Purpose: make atomic operation. Without this command there would be a chance that a waited packet did not cause command WAITALL stop waiting if it was accepted after SEND but before WAITALL started waiting. However it would be registered as received in any case. This command should be always used when you need to send a request and RELIABLY receive a response on it never missing.
).
command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) or next block of script will be processed by several times = <number of iterations>. The "inf" value is available which means infinite iterant processing.
10 {
// copies to temporal variable, then prints its value
temp =
'array$i$'
PRINT
PARAMETERS: <message>
Displays the given message. Use symbol in message to indicate that line feed must be performed.
'$temp$\n'
i += 1 }
// creates fields which correspond symbols of tcp.data
POS
PARAMETERS: <new position> | <field's name>
Sets the <new position> of byte pointer. In the case of <field's name> new position will be equal to field's position.
= td i = 0 CYC
PARAMETERS: <number of iterations>
Command instructs that next WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in DEFAULTS
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any | REVERS
PARAMETERS: not command
Request specification. May only be given in parameters for DEFAULT command. Instructs to reverse the request for every packet.
}
Defines default requests for packets. These requests will be applied when there are not enough explicitly defined requests for some packet (specified as parameters to command SEND, WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
and its analogs). Initially default requests are ACCEPT ANY ANY... i.e. a single request for the first interface specified via option -d.
(command DEFAULT). For TCP DEVICE
PARAMETERS: <type of device> {<name of interface>}
Reopens interfaces. The type of device: eth, ip, tcp. The name of device is the same as for -d option, depends on the type of device. New line terminates the list of names.
the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Analog of WAIT command. Adds the above packet to the set of packets which will be waited by command WAIT or its analogs. This command does not start actual waiting (doesn't suspend script execution). Nevertheless, just after adding the packet may be registered as received. If some packet is registered as received before the call to WAIT (WAITALL
PARAMETERS: no parameters
The analog of WAIT command. Doesn't add the previously defined packet to the list of waited ones. Starts waiting simply. Packets may be already added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command (or using of UNFIX command).
) then the command will ignore it and wait for a next packet (see also SENDWAITOTHER
PARAMETERS: no parameters
Works similar to "SEND WAITALL" sentence. Purpose: make atomic operation. Without this command there would be a chance that a waited packet did not cause command WAITALL stop waiting if it was accepted after SEND but before WAITALL started waiting. However it would be registered as received in any case. This command should be always used when you need to send a request and RELIABLY receive a response on it never missing.
).
command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) or next block of script will be processed by several times = <number of iterations>. The "inf" value is available which means infinite iterant processing.
5 { .
'tdsym$i$'
30 i += 1 }
// assigns created fields by successive values
i = 0 temp = 50 CYC
PARAMETERS: <number of iterations>
Command instructs that next WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in DEFAULTS
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any | REVERS
PARAMETERS: not command
Request specification. May only be given in parameters for DEFAULT command. Instructs to reverse the request for every packet.
}
Defines default requests for packets. These requests will be applied when there are not enough explicitly defined requests for some packet (specified as parameters to command SEND, WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
and its analogs). Initially default requests are ACCEPT ANY ANY... i.e. a single request for the first interface specified via option -d.
(command DEFAULT). For TCP DEVICE
PARAMETERS: <type of device> {<name of interface>}
Reopens interfaces. The type of device: eth, ip, tcp. The name of device is the same as for -d option, depends on the type of device. New line terminates the list of names.
the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Analog of WAIT command. Adds the above packet to the set of packets which will be waited by command WAIT or its analogs. This command does not start actual waiting (doesn't suspend script execution). Nevertheless, just after adding the packet may be registered as received. If some packet is registered as received before the call to WAIT (WAITALL
PARAMETERS: no parameters
The analog of WAIT command. Doesn't add the previously defined packet to the list of waited ones. Starts waiting simply. Packets may be already added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command (or using of UNFIX command).
) then the command will ignore it and wait for a next packet (see also SENDWAITOTHER
PARAMETERS: no parameters
Works similar to "SEND WAITALL" sentence. Purpose: make atomic operation. Without this command there would be a chance that a waited packet did not cause command WAITALL stop waiting if it was accepted after SEND but before WAITALL started waiting. However it would be registered as received in any case. This command should be always used when you need to send a request and RELIABLY receive a response on it never missing.
).
command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT
PARAMETERS: {accept | drop | any }
Waits for packet whose mask is defined above. The command will finish work when such packet is received on waitable interface. The waitable interface is interface for which strict request (accept or drop) have been specified in parameters to command or in defaults (command DEFAULT). For TCP device the command will only wait data on the main interface. In the general case command may wait no one but several packets (added by ADD
PARAMETERS:
Alias of TOWAIT command.
command). If any of them is received then command terminates. Command waits packets until timeout expires (command TIMEOUT
PARAMETERS: <interval in milliseconds>
Defines the timeout for WAIT command (and its analogs), also for imitation of application's work. Null value means infinite timeout (such timeout will not be applied for imitation of application's work). In the case of negative value its absolute value will be obtained as timeout, but WAIT command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) will work differently: it will always wait for the whole timeout (not terminating on first received packet). So several packets may be registered as received. This command also defines the timeout for TCP server while waiting for connections.
). See "samples/waiting_packets.fws".
command (its analogs) or next block of script will be processed by several times = <number of iterations>. The "inf" value is available which means infinite iterant processing.
5 {
'tdsym$i$'
= temp i += 1 temp += 1 }
// prints tcp.data
PRINT
PARAMETERS: <message>
Displays the given message. Use symbol in message to indicate that line feed must be performed.
'$td$\n'
 
/*   Output:    0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  23456      */